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or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. to my left is tom allen, former congressman from maine and chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left his james shapiro, who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and an author and vice president of the author's built, a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york. did you also come down from new york? from washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently given the great honor by his colleagues at the washington college of law to have a lecture named after him. congratulations and thank you for joining us. [applause] so our topic is copyright and the book. very
the lawful property of southern families, namely their slaves. and there was no compromise that could erase those tensions. they had been trying to compromise the issue of slavery for three generations. they compromised over slavery when they wrote the constitution. they compromised over slavery when they passed the northwest -- opening the upper midwest. they compromised over slavery in 1820 with the famous missouri compromise. they compromised over slavery in 1850 with the fugitive slave act and in 1854 with the kansas/nebraska act. the dred scott opinion of the supreme court was supposed to be compromised, resolving the issue of slavery. they had tried and tried and tried to compromise. it had not worked and that is why the crisis came. if one nation sharing the same congress, operating under the same laws, could not compromise the issue, how could two nations side-by-side, sharing these vital arteries of commerce and communication, how could they hope to resolve the issue? and what's more, lincoln understood that if secession managed one success there would not be illogical into it. we
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
there, you have to enforce the law. but you have now, and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and identify who you are and refuse to police ourselves refuse to do everything if you're here illegally, it's hard for me to tell you you're or taken advantage of the richest venture in the world. he seems to be saying please come and exploit me. to some extent we have to reestablish the rule of law. the only point to try to make during the debate that had a significant impact on our side in solidifying the degree to which people adopt positions that made no sense. two points. one is for not going to deport grandmother's. some of you may disagree with that, but if you look at this country as a whole, the idea behind grandmother's, the churches will protect them. their families will protect them. and they cannot pin. conservatives should not write laws that are fantasies. i didn't say i'm for people who come here illegally, but i'm prefiguring out a patch of residency to get them to pay taxes, get them to be within the law, get them to be not exploited and
you in a bad position of the post office. but instead of saying get over it, many state laws about privacy. when supreme court dealt with the case about gps, the supreme court didn't say, hey, we have technology, get over privacy, they said -- and this is a supreme court that doesn't agree on anything, they said privacy is important. something even this minor is where you are to give away information about whether you know it or not abortion clinic, a competitor to your bosses, this information is being tracked on the web through smart phones actually have huge ramifications. it's what we do? in europe, they actually have protective laws. you can find out what data aggregators are talking about you, if you have wrong information, you can correct it. so i might be googling diabetes or a friend or a product, and not for, it doesn't mean that i'm unhealthy, but the federal trade commission is actually considering having a do not track regulation. sort of like the do not call list. i will end up with something that the trade commission that when we were on a panel together. the chairma
interaction with our country are to violate our laws or at best to completely ignore them. are we running the risk of inculcating a culture of lawlessness? i'd certainly like to have your thoughts on how we can avoid this problem and solve this issue by not only strengthening our country, but hopefully avoiding further demise. >> well, i think whatever way we define immigration has to include control of the border and has to include some kind of worker permit system which is actually rigorously enforced. that is i happen to think you're going to ultimately end up with some kind of system that has people who are resident but not citizen and who have a work permit but are not on a path to citizenship, because i think that's a matter of -- at some point, you've got to be practical about what is doable. but i think it's very important to insure as you build that that you're actually going to enforce the law. and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and we refuse to identify who you are and we refuse to police ourselves and we refuse to do anything if we fi
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
obamacare for her. spent and this is for my mother-in-law. we take very good care of the women. >> this corrects the history on 200 years. >> what a pleasure. keep up the great work. >> thank you so much. thank you for coming. hello. >> [inaudible] >> or he will take his job. >> there you go. [inaudible] >> how do you know kelly? >> [inaudible] >> you are here in d.c.? >> yeah, yeah. >> she is my favorite surgeon. it really nice to meet you. stay on this side. if we start a trend it will take too long. and by the way, my handwriting was a little worse because i was writing while i was taking the picture. did it come out of? >> i have no idea. >> you're going to love it. thank you. >> i have to, one for me, one for my and. -- my aunt. >> did i spell that wrong? >> no, that's perfect. >> thank you. thank you for coming. >> yeah. >> keep them moving here. >> hi, my name is john. >> nice to meet you, john. [inaudible] >> it's a timely book, that's why there's a few typos in it. your name is john? >> john. >> so why did you leave oklahoma? there's a lot of oil out there. you just ca
in the development of international refugee law policy. the international office of refugees who won the 1938 nobel peace prize. he yearns to -- diaspora and he was the russians could do something that can to the inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a tattered to mail in equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. luckily he didn't have to do that. he departed shanghai on a better bicycle but upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok into a secondhand motorcycle in singapore. the benefactor gave him a brand-new aeriel motorcycle in karachi plus a letter the guaranteed parts and assistance in aerial offices around the world. in his published a county think the worldwide services of the ymca ,-com,-com ma shell oil and the firestone company and he depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industry of good services that were now spread almost everywhere in the world. like the circumspect wing south asian diaspora he made his transit with think richmond of scattered white russians. above all there was his passport fo
," law represent pew boy examines haiti's history. david talbot presents a history of san francisco in the 1970s in "season of the witch: enchantment, terror and deliverance in the city of love." in "quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking," author susan cain examines the benefits of an introverted personality. david drayly looks at 1862 and the actions of abraham lincoln in "rise to greatness: abraham lincoln's most perilous year." and in "full body burden: growing up in the nuclear shadow of rocky flats," kristin iverson investigates the nuclear weapons plant that was located near her childhood home. for an extended list of links to various publications' book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or facebook.com/booktv. >> and another update from capitol hill as reporters wait here for word from lawmakerrers in closed-door meetings on the fiscal cliff. an update via twitter from chad pilgrim of fox news, reid's remark that he had made a counteroffer was off-the-cuff response and that there was no counteroffer, and "the washington post" quoting s
law at the schools and to take orders, who believe that [inaudible]. of the cleric in charge. the politics of nigeria became complicated, simply because of something the british did. they were not satisfied. there had to be dissension, division in the sense of the political power in the country. so when the british left, before the left they created -- [inaudible] and naturally they wanted closest to their viable or already practicing a kind of structure, which is close to what the british practice at the time until later in the year. and so they not only falsified the elections that followed, preceded independence. they falsified even consensus. now, if you check the annals of home office, so-called home office, which is where the colonies are ministered, look for the book of harold smith was one of the civil service in nigeria at the time. he was in the white house and he got into trouble because he not will -- he did not want to carry out those orders. but falsification of the first elections. .. which is staged -- that is southern southerners from the eastern part. throug
be the network of a law firm that perhaps, you know, only spans from new york to los angeles. it might be a network like facebook or google. but what's striking and necessary to understand the way it manifests itself physically is that networks carry networks. you might have a global backbone company like a level three or a tata that own the strands of glass and that own the conduits that might run perhaps beside railroad tracks across the country. you might have another company, sort of a mid-sized network services company, one called hurricane electric, that might actually illuminate those strands of glass. they might own the light. ask and then you might have a goldman sachs or large law firm that buys bandwidth on that glass. so it's, you know, we often talk about b the information superhighway as if the network itself were the highway. i hike to think of it more -- i like to think of it more that a given network is a car chugging along the highway side by side with other networks because there's definitely a layering going on that's crucial to understanding the way in which the ne
and states all across the country were beginning to institute censorship laws. and hollywood had brought in will rogers who had been in the harding cabinet and was, you know, mr. protestant. and kennedy now positioned himself as the heir protestant, the non-jew. and he made himself indispensable to the industry as such. and studio after studio hired him. at one point he ran four major studios. and at each of those he demanded to be paid in stock options. by the time he left hollywood after only a couple of years, he was a multimillionaire because he knew how to manipulate those stock options. he knew how to turn those pieces of paper into dollars, millions of dollars. and he did. at age 50 having learned how to make an advantage of a disadvantage, at age 50 he had those millions and millions and millions of dollars. and at age 50 he knew the way the stock market worked, the way stocks and bonds are traded, and he knew that a crash was coming, and he pulled out all his money so that when the crash did come, he was left with his millions. in a extraordinary position. and yet with that cras
to become its director. he began at oxford in the junior position in law and social science of what he wrote to the ranks about the institution to become a tech executive. the cultural nature of human development, the accidental gorilla, peggy pascoe's book on law and race in america. daniel walker and his history of america between 1815 and 1848. ladies and gentlemen, niko pfund. anna. >> thank you very much for coming here. for listening to us talk friday afternoon. i'm so that we chose to spend your afternoon with us. i have spent 10 years working for a library in and spent about half of that time physically working in a library. as a director of nyu press, i am thrilled to be here and to talk to you about publishing. i was asked to give you a quick overview of our philosophy. it sounds a little pretentious, but i would say that in terms of how i look at what we do, it is squarely driven by the message of oup. we often say that we don't exist to make money, but we do have to make money to do the things that we exist to do. it really doesn't want form all the work that we engage in. perso
to the law and order. many were heated arguments almost a danger point. local author polly jacobson wrote of it. when i first started working in san francisco in february of 1850, sawyer continued, i wanted to be an engineer on a steamer. mark twain nodded in disapproval but got sidetracked in performing the honest business of fighting fire and training a gang of ragtag adolescent boys. the city needed volunteers and runners. sawyer's life saving acts of courage aboard a steamboat, which mark twain had a particular horror, awaken the journalist at night and set him shaking cloud of cigar smoke. for that reason he had sweat rolling down his brow. his story of fire and explosion on board the steamboat independence. in which hundreds died. the steamer was launched in new york city on christmas day of 1850. it did not reach sentences go for the first time until september 17, 1851. a white trail almost abandoned. between houses peer and clay street wharf. the exhaust steam escape into the air like a virginia city hot spring. i'm going to leave out the shipwreck, which is pretty horrible. tom s
causes people to drive more. there's something called the fundamental law of traffic congestion that establishes that vehicle miles traveled increase roughly one for one with highway miles built. if you build it, they will drive, okay? the only way to make sure that our city streets are moved sufficiently is to charge people for it, to actually do what singapore does, second densest country in the world, and yet you can drive around it effortlylessly because they have that electronic road pricing thing that charges you for using these streets. america's cities are running, essentially, a soviet-style urban transit policy. they used to have grocery stores that would give away eggs and butter at far below market prices, the result was you couldn't get the goods. that's what we do with our city streets. they're a valuable commodity, and as a result, they're the urban equivalent of long lines which are traffic jams. there's no path other than actually making people pay for the cost of their actions. now, we already, of course, pay plenty, and one of the enduring challenges of cities
. president laws of the clinton global the initiative announcing a major new direction on this topic and there are many people that work on this topic to have helped move it forward on the agenda but one of them as a lot of credit. >> we've been talking with philip auerswald, the coming prosperity, entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy. his most recent book. book tv on location at george mason university. >>> now on book tv, alex berezow argues that while antiscience is usually a term associated with conservatives, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commerc
, unlike the skip tracers and bag men who, in mr. leonard's work, usually represent the law and order history. raylan is an anacreonism for town, and he shows what mr. leonard holds dear, the values he can common in different american rhythm. those of, for instance, richard ford or robert frost or even mark twain. this is a quote. please concentrate... you can cut official corners to call a man out but couldn't walk in a man's house unless ininvited or else with a warrant. it was the way he was raced, with good manners. back when he was living in the coal camp and miners struck, raylan walking a picket line, his dad in the house dying of black lung, and a couple came across the street, with pick handles, and walked up to where his mother was on the porch. they said they wanted to speak to her brother. she told them, you don't walk in a person's home unless your invited, even you people must believe that. you have homes, don't you? wifes and mothers keeping house? they shoved her aside and hit raylan with a pick handle to put him down. her words hadn't stopped them. what they did was s
censor laws in hollywood had rotted will rogers would then departing cabinet and kennedy now positioned himself as the non-jew and made himself indispensable to the industry as such. studio after studio hired him. at one point herein for major studios in at each of those he demanded to be paid in stock options. the time he left hollywood, he was a multimillionaire and he knew how to manipulate the stock options. he knew how to turn those pieces of paper into dollars, millions of dollars and he did. at age 50 learned how to make an advantage the disadvantage and had this millions and millions and millions of dollars. at age 50 he knew how the stock market were permanently stocks and bonds are treated and he knew the crash is coming up or that all his money so when the crash did come coming here is blessed with his million and extraordinary positions. and yet, with that crash will recess. from the recession now. we all know people who are suffering, but it doesn't compare to the depression of the 30s. kennedy was scared to death at everything but the country he loved because it had given
into law -- created the environmental protection agency. one of the first orders of business of the ecb the a was to ban a series of insecticides starting with ddt and including all of its cousins, many of which were more toxic than ddt. the domestic ban went into effect in 1972. began phasing them out and it is too bad carson didn't live to see that but she didn't and i like to think of her in this photograph taken by her friends the freeman family who lived next door to her in maine on the shoreline of southport island in 1955, of my favorite photographs of her. she looks very content in this picture and someone who was at home in that environment and at home in the world and at home in her role as an author, scientist and ultimately somebody who would change the way we think about things. that is a good place to stop and take any questions you have. >> anybody have any questions? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? that probably stems from the opening chapter in which she described a spring in which the birds are absent from the tow
of international refugee law and policy. soboleff yearned to rally members of the non-bolshevik russian diaspora and he wished russians to do something akin to lindens recent flight across the land but in a july, soboleff decided it was up to him to do a proudly pattered canadian equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. likely he didn't have to do that actually. he departed shanghai on a battered secondhand bicycle, but then upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok, then to a battered secondhand motorcycle in singapore. a benefactor gave him a brand-new aerial motorcycle in karachi, guaranteed parts and systems from aerial offices around the world. soboleff and his publisher can also think the worldwide services of the ymca, shell oil and the firestone company, and he depend on global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industrial goods services that were now spent almost everywhere in the world. like a certain cycle in a south asian diaspora, soboleff made his transit with the encouragement of many scattered white russians. above all, it was his passport for which he was
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21